How many jobs are running?
What partitions do I have access to?
How many CPUs can I use?
Where should I submit my jobs?

Any of those sound familiar?

We know it’s not always easy to navigate the native scheduler tools, their syntax, and the gazillion options they provide.

Enter sh_part

So today, we’re introducing sh_part[1], a new command on Sherlock, that will simplify navigating Sherlock’s partitions, and provide an user-focused, centralized view of its computing resources.

To run it, simply type sh_part at the prompt on any login or compute node, and you’ll be greeted by something like this:

$ sh_part
       QUEUE   FREE  TOTAL   FREE  TOTAL RESORC  OTHER MAXJOBTIME   CORES      NODE   GRES
   PARTITION  CORES  CORES  NODES  NODES PENDNG PENDNG  DAY-HR:MN PERNODE    MEM-GB (COUNT)
     normal*     30   1600      0     76   2801   2278    7-00:00   20-24   128-191 -
     bigmem       0     88      0      2     90      1    1-00:00   32-56  512-3072 -
        dev      50     56      2      3     32      0    0-02:00   16-20       128 -
        gpu      62    140      0      7    121      0    7-00:00   16-24   191-256 gpu:8(1),gpu:4(6)

You’ll find a brief list of partitions you have access to, complete with information about the number of available nodes/cores and pending jobs.

  • in the QUEUE PARTITION column, the * character indicates the default partition.
  • the RESOURCE PENDING column shows the core count of pending jobs that are waiting on resources,
  • the OTHER PENDING column lists core counts for jobs that are pending for other reasons, such as licenses, user, group or any other limit,
  • the GRES column shows the number and type of GRES available in that partition, and the number of nodes that feature that specific GRES combination in paranteses. So for instance, in the output above, the gpu partition features ` node with 8 GPUs, and 6 nodes with 4 GPUs each.

Hopefully sh_part will make it easier to figure out cluster activity, and allow users to get a better understanding of what’s running and what’s available in the various Sherlock partitions.

As usual, if you have any question or comment, please don’t hesitate to reach out at srcc-support@stanford.edu.


  1. sh_part is based on the spart tool, written by Ahmet Mercan.